Molecular Constructor is a free 3D modeling software for building molecules. Using this application user can design a molecule and optimize its geometry at the same time.

 

The more advanced desktop version can be found at the project website: http://molconstr.com/

 

My Molecularium is a fun and challenging molecule building game. Launch atoms at target bond sites to assemble essential molecules of increasing complexity and difficulty. Move your device to direct your shots using the laser-guided gyroscopic aim. Use and learn chemical and structural formulas to help you build a wide range of fascinating molecules, from water and vitamin C to caffeine and adrenaline.

Featuring Oxy, Carbón and the crew of atom characters and MEL, the computer of the Molecularium, from the Giant Screen adventure Molecules to the MAX !

My Molecularium features hours of mind-expanding gameplay. Encountering new challenges on every level while building and learning over 30 accurate 3D molecular models has excellent and rewarding replay value.

Excellent educational value! Learn essential concepts of chemistry easily through play and effortlessly understand molecular structures of our Universe. Fun yet rewarding, not a waste of time. Your parents will encourage to play.

Features:
• Laser-guided Gyroscopic Aiming
• Move your device to aim
• Variable speed launch control
• Accurate 3D Molecular Models
• Learn chemical and structural formulas
• Learn fun facts about molecules and their properties
• Rapid Fire Power Shot (in app purchase)
• Build over 30 different molecules
• 3 levels with new challenges each level
• Time, accuracy and completion bonuses
• Leaderboard and lots of achievements
• Challenge your friends with your high score
• Phenomenally fun physic-based motions
• Trajectory bending atomic attraction
• Innovative and inspiring gameplay
• Unlimited fulfilling fun

Use the unique fun-based constructive powers of My Molecularium to change the way you look at everything forever.

Always at the forefront of innovation, the University of Waterloo initiated a collaborative student-design project to celebrate 2011 as the International Year of Chemistry. Chem 13 News together with the Chemistry Department and the Faculty of Science encouraged chemistry educators and enthusiasts worldwide to adopt an element and artistically interpret that element to eventually be brought together in a mosaic of science and art. A year later, with the project complete, we have designs by chemistry students from all Canadian provinces and territories, 20 US states and 14 different countries. Each element captures a unique and creative spark but together they ignite a passion for chemistry.

The ChemDoodle Web Components library is a pure Javascript chemical graphics and cheminformatics library derived from the ChemDoodle® application and produced by iChemLabs. ChemDoodle Web Components allow the wielder to present publication quality 2D and 3D graphics and animations for chemical structures, reactions and spectra. Beyond graphics, this tool provides a framework for user interaction to create dynamic applications through web browsers, desktop platforms and mobile devices such as the iPhone, iPad and Android devices. This library also has complete access to the entire ChemDoodle desktop API through AJAX, allowing for quick access to one of the most robust chemical graphics and informatics packages in existence directly through Javascript.


The goal of the project is to utilize the next-generation HTML5 technologies to power the scientific and educational applications of the future. iChemLabs is dedicated to funding, developing and hosting this library and has released it for free under the open-source GPL license. By releasing ChemDoodle Web Components open-source, yet continuing to financially support the library, iChemLabs ensures that the next generation of scientific applications is easily achievable by academia, government and industry, and helps to make sure that the cost of education decreases while using the web to further spread science.

 

There is a review here https://jcheminf.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13321-015-0085-3

And there are some tutorials available on the Macs in Chemistry website https://www.macinchem.org/reviews/hints_tutorials.php