Macs in Chemistry

Insanely Great Science

Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group

 

RSC-Group-Logo-Chemical-Information-and-Computer-Applications

My Royal Society of Chemistry annual subscription letter just arrived. This is a good time to think about Interest Group membership, if you are a member of the RSC you can join several interest groups for free, however disappointingly many people fail to take advantage of this opportunity.

Interest Groups are scientific networks run by members for their community. Each group is themed around a specific area or application of the chemical sciences. They organise an annual series of events to cater for both their members and the wider scientific community. These events vary from: multi-day conferences and workshops to training events.

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one such group (Group number 86), you can find out more on the CICAG website.

The storage, retrieval, analysis and preservation of chemical information and data are of critical importance for research, development and education in the chemical sciences. All chemists, and everybody else who works with chemical substances, need tools and techniques for handling chemical information.

CICAG works to:

  • Support users of chemical information, data and computer applications and advance excellence in the chemical sciences
  • Inform RSC members and others of the latest developments in these rapidly evolving areas;
  • Promote the wider recognition of excellence in chemical information and computer applications at this level

This year CICAG has been involved in a workshop on Computational Tool for Drug Discovery, 2nd Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry, and the 20 Years of Rule of Five Meeting. In addition CICAG has supported the Sheffield Cheminformatics Meeting, Dial a Molecule, Artificial Intelligence and Augmented Intelligence for Automated Investigations for Scientific Discovery network and the In Silico Toxicology Networking Meeting. In addition to other outreach activities.

RSC CICAG publish a regular Newsletter which keeps members in touch with the Group's activities and includes articles, reviews of interest, news and events.

If you would like to join the group you can do so by adding interest group 86 to the last page of the renewal form and returning it to the RSC or you can make a request to join a group via email (membership@rsc.org) or telephone (01223 432141).

Comments

2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry

 

The 2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry is now over, two intensive days of presentations and posters. Many thanks for all who took part and made it such a successful event.

Special mention to the Poster prize winners.

P17 by Jenke Scheen of the University of Edinburgh Entitled: "Improving the accuracy of alchemical free energy methods by learning correction terms for binding energy estimates"

P6 by Adam Green of the University of Leeds Entitled: "Activity-directed discovery of inhibitors of the p53/MDM2 interaction: towards autonomous functional molecule discovery"

P3 by Ya Chen of the University of Hamburg Entitled: "NP-Scout: machine learning approach for the identification of natural products and natural product-like compounds in large molecular databases"

If you want to browse through the Twitter feeds search for the #AIChem19 hashtag.

Many of the presentations are now available in pdf format on the meeting website.

We are already thinking about a possible 3rd meeting, and any feedback would be much appreciated.

Comments

2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry

 

AI-webpage-image

I was just looking through the delegate registrations for the 2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry Meeting taking place in Cambridge, UK 2nd to 3rd September 2019. We now have significantly more registrations than the first meeting, participants are coming from 16 different countries and whilst the UK and US predominate there are many participants from the rest of Europe and even some from Japan and Korea. There are 90 different organisations represented and I'm delighted to see there are over 20 student attendees, many from overseas. A number of students are presenting posters and the lineup of people taking part in the flash poster session can be found here.

Registration is still open for what looks like what will be another outstanding meeting.

A few people have said they are planning a visit to Cambridge for a holiday around the meeting and have asked for suggestions of things to do. Visit Cambridge is a good place to start.


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Support for attending meetings

 

Just finished the RSC CICAG committee meeting and one of the discussion items was support for people to attend conferences and meetings. CICAG is committed to supporting attendance at our meetings in as many ways as possible. We always ensure that the venue supports wheelchair access and that any meals accommodate any dietary requirements that have been gathered on registration.

We offer student bursaries to help cover registration, travel, and accommodation if required. These are detailed on the individual conference pages. If you are making a particularly lengthly journey and need additional help please get in touch and we will see what we can do to help.

There are also travel grants Travel grants both for students and early career scientists https://www.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Funding/division-travel-grants/index.asp to attend conferences or workshops.

A recent addition are awards for carers https://www.rsc.org/campaigning-outreach/campaigning/incldiv/grants-for-carers/ caring responsibilities are wide and varied, but they can sometimes be hard to balance alongside attending conferences.

If you have any other suggestions feel free to email cicagrsc@gmail.com

Upcoming meetings

2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry Website
Twenty Years of the Rule of Five Website.

Comments

In which area is Artificial Intelligence likely to most impact Chemistry, the results are in

 

I ran a poll last week asking "In which area is Artificial Intelligence likely to most impact Chemistry?" And we now have the results.

pollResults

Whilst Molecular Design was the most popular choice it was interesting to see that all options were well supported. This suggests that there are opportunities for artificial intelligence to have an impact in many facets of chemistry. I'm delighted to see this since this was part of the thinking behind the AI in Chemistry meeting and I think the line up of speakers will have something for everyone.

2nd RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG, Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry, Monday-Tuesday, 2nd to 3rd September 2019. Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, UK. #AIChem19

Synopsis
Artificial Intelligence is presently experiencing a renaissance in development of new methods and practical applications to ongoing challenges in Chemistry. Following the success of the inaugural “Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry” meeting in 2018, we are pleased to announce that the Biological & Medicinal Chemistry Sector (BMCS) and Chemical Information & Computer Applications Group (CICAG) of the Royal Society of Chemistry are once again organising a conference to present the current efforts in applying these new methods. The meeting will be held over two days and will combine aspects of artificial intelligence and deep machine learning methods to applications in chemistry.

Programme (draft)

Monday, 2nd September
08.30
Registration, refreshments
09.30
Deep learning applied to ligand-based de novo design: a real-life lead optimization case study
Quentin Perron, IKTOS, France
10.00
A. Turing test for molecular generators
Jacob Bush, GlaxoSmithKline, UK
10.30
Flash poster presentations
11.00
Refreshments, exhibition and posters
11.30
Presentation title to be confirmed
Keynote: Regina Barzilay, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
12.30
Lunch, exhibition and posters
14.00
Artificial intelligence for predicting molecular Electrostatic Potentials (ESPs): a step towards developing ESP-guided knowledge-based scoring functions
Prakash Rathi, Astex Pharmaceuticals, UK
14.30
Molecular transformer for chemical reaction prediction and uncertainty estimation
Alpha Lee, University of Cambridge, UK
15.00
Drug discovery disrupted - quantum physics meets machine learning
Noor Shaker, GTN, UK
15.30
Refreshments, exhibition and posters
16.00
Application of AI in chemistry: where are we in drug design?
Christian Tyrchan, AstraZeneca, Sweden
16.30
Presentation title to be confirmed
Anthony Nicholls, OpenEye Scientific Software, USA
17.30 Close
18.45 Drinks reception
19.15 Conference dinner

Tuesday, 3rd September
08.30
Refreshments
09.00v Deep generative models for 3D compound design from fragment screens
Fergus Imrie, University of Oxford, UK
09.30
DeeplyTough: learning to structurally compare protein binding sites
Joshua Meyers, BenevolentAI, UK
10.00
Discovery of nanoporous materials for energy applications
Maciej Haranczyk, IMDEA Materials Institute, Spain
10.30
Refreshments, exhibition and posters
11.00
Deep learning for drug discovery
Keynote: David Koes, University of Pittsburgh, USA
12.00
Networking lunch, exhibition and posters
14.00
Presentation title to be confirmed
Olexandr Isayev, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA
14.30
Dreaming functional molecules with generative ML models
Christoph Kreisbeck, Kebotix, USA
15.00
Refreshments, exhibition and posters
15.30
Presentation title to be confirmed
Keynote: Adrian Roitberg, University of Florida, USA
16.30
Close

You can get more information and register here https://www.maggichurchouseevents.co.uk/bmcs/AI-2019.htm.


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Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery

Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery (with SCI).
10 April 2019, The Studio, Birmingham.
https://www.soci.org/events/scirsc-workshop-on-computational-tools-for-drug-discovery

Details of the workshops

Attendees will be able to choose from 4 of 6 sessions.

Optibrium Guided multi-parameter optimisation of 2D and 3D SAR

In this workshop, we will explore the concept of multi-parameter optimisation (MPO) and its application to quickly target high-quality compounds with a balance of potency and appropriate absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties. We will further illustrate how this concept can be combined with an understanding of 2D and 3D structure-activity relationships (SAR) to guide the design of new, improved compounds.

The workshop will be based on practical 'hands-on' examples using our StarDrop™ software and all participants will get a 1-month free trial license to use StarDrop following the workshop. For more information on StarDrop, please visit our website or watch some videos of StarDrop in action at www.optibrium.com/community/videos.

Cresset Next generation structure-based design with Flare

Learn how simple structure-based design can be within small molecule discovery projects. The workshop will cover ligand design in the protein active site, Electrostatic Complementarity™ maps and scores, ensemble docking of ligands with Lead Finder, calculations of water stability and locations using 3D-RISM, energetics of ligand binding using WaterSwap and use of Python extensions. Applications you will use: Flare™ , Lead Finder™.

Dotmatics Data visualisation and analysis with Dotmatics

Dotmatics offers a comprehensive scientific software platform for knowledge management, data storage, enterprise searching and reporting. The focus of the workshop will be the Dotmatics visualisation and data analysis software in small molecule drug discovery workflows around compound selection from vendor catalogues and analysis of lead optimisation datasets as typically found in drug discovery.

BioSolveIT Fast – Visual – Easy – computer-aided drug design for all chemists

In this workshop you will learn - hands-on - to use modern software for hit-finding, hit-to-lead and lead optimization. We will walk you around the drug discovery cycle and show you: how to assess your protein and discover a binding site; how simple modifications to the bound molecule affect the binding affinity; how to replace a scaffold or explore sub-pockets for improved binding; how to keep all your key ADME-parameters in check, while you optimize your lead; and last but not least how to quickly find new starting points in a giant 3.8 billion vendor catalog of compounds ready for purchase.

Instead of dry theory, we will explain those use cases based on real-world scenarios and interesting targets such as Thrombin, BTK, Endothiapepsin and BRD4. Bring your own laptop to try this out for yourself right away and receive the software as well as a free trial license on top. The Software tools are called:

SeeSAR – "modeling for all chemists" and REAL Space Navigator – "the world’s largest searchable catalog of compounds on demand".

Knime An interactive workflow for hit list triaging

In this workshop I will introduce a workflow built using the open source KNIME Analytics Platform for doing hit-list triaging and selecting compounds for confirmatory assays or other followup testing. We will use a real-world HTS dataset and work through reading the data in, flagging molecules that are likely to have interfered with the assay, manual "rescue" of compounds removed by the filters, and selecting a compound subset that covers the chemical diversity of the hits yet still allows learning some SAR from subsequent experiments. Participants will be provided with both the dataset and the workflow used during the workshop so that they can adapt it to their own needs.

ChemAxon Computational intelligence driven drug design

The most recent era of vast data sources, rapid data processing and model building enables drug designers to propose high quality structures in ideation phase in lean ("fail-early") discovery cycles. The goal of this workshop is to demonstrate an integrated system (Marvin Live) to:

freely create, store and manage ideas utilize computational models such as phys-chem properties, 3D alignment, predictive models (created in KNIME) exploit existing evidences (MMP, various data sources) during design session. The dynamic plugin system facilitates balancing attributes through comparison and triage of hypothetical compounds on a single interface.

Comments

CICAG meetings 2019

 

Meetings for 2019 that CICAG (http://www.rsccicag.org) is involved with.

Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery (with SCI).
10 April 2019, The Studio, Birmingham.
https://www.soci.org/events/scirsc-workshop-on-computational-tools-for-drug-discovery A great opportunity to gets hands on training to get you started on a variety of important software tools. All software and training materials required for the workshop will be provided for attendees to install and run on their own laptops and use for a limited period afterwards.

Eighth Joint Sheffield Conference on Chemoinformatics, The Edge, University of Sheffield, UK, Monday 17th – Wednesday 19th June, 2019..
https://cisrg.shef.ac.uk/shef2019/ CICAG are really delighted to be sponsoring this meeting.

AI in chemistry (with RSC-BMCS).
Two-day meeting to be held in Cambridge on 2nd and 3rd September 2019. Fitzwilliam College
https://www.maggichurchouseevents.co.uk/bmcs/AI-2019.htm First very successful meeting in London was heavily oversubscribed, closing date for oral abstracts is 31 March and Posters 5 July.

Post-grad Cheminformatics/CompChem symposium, Wednesday 4th Sept 2019 Cambridge Chemistry Dept.
Opportunity for Post-grads to meet and present their work. Keep the date free, meeting details to be published soon, Cambridge Cheminformatics Network meeting will immediately follow the meeting so why not make a day of it.

20 years of Ro5 (with RSC-BMCS).
Wednesday, 20th November 2019, Sygnature Discovery, BioCity, Nottingham, UK.
It has been over 20 years since Lipinski published his work determining the properties of drug molecules associated with good solubility and permeability. Since then, there have been a number of additions and expansions to these “rules”. There has also been keen interest in the application of these guidelines in the drug discovery process and how these apply to new emerging chemical structures such as macrocycles. This symposium will bring together researchers from a number of different areas of drug discovery and will provide a historical overview of the use of Lipinski’s rules as well as look to the future and how we use these rules in the changing drug compound landscape. Details will be on https://www.maggichurchouseevents.co.uk/bmcs/ in the near future.

Comments

SCI-RSC Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery

 

I'm delighted to report this meeting seems to be filling up fast

All scientists working in drug discovery need tools and techniques for handling chemical information. This workshop offers a unique opportunity to try out a range of software packages for themselves with expert tuition in different aspects of pre-clinical drug discovery. Attendees will be able to choose from sessions covering data processing and visualisation; ligand and structure-based design, or ADMET prediction run by the software providers. All software and training materials required for the workshop will be provided for attendees to install and run on their own laptops and use for a limited period afterwards

More details

Presentations from Optibrium / Cresset / Dotmatics /BioSolveIT/ Knime / ChemAxon

Comments

Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery

 

Registration opened just before Christmas and apparently there were a number of people sign up over the festive period. Remember there are a limited number of places and it is first come first served.

Registration and full details are here.

Computational Tools Flyer

This workshop is intended to provide expert tutorials to get you started and show what can be achieved with the software.

Comments

Workshop on Computational Tools for Drug Discovery

 

In many companies/institutions/universities new arrivals are presented with a variety of desktop tools with little or no advice on how to use them other than "pick it up as you along". This workshop is intended to provide expert tutorials to get you started and show what can be achieved with the software.

The tutorials will be given a series of outstanding experts Christian Lemmen (BioSolveIT), Akos Tarcsay (ChemAxon), Giovanna Tedesco (Cresset), Dan Ormsby (Dotmatics) Greg Landrum (Knime ) and Matt Segall (Optibrium), you will be able to install the software packages on you own laptops together with a license to allow you to use it for a limited period after the event.

Registration and full details are here.

Computational Tools Flyer



Comments

RSC CICAG Interest Group

 

Royal Society of Chemistry members will be getting their annual subscription details around now. Can I remind people that your membership entitles you to membership of up to THREE Interest Groups. Apparently only around 25% take advantage of this option so I'd urge you to have a look at the groups available

In particular I'd like to highlight:-

86 Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Groups, which exist to benefit RSC members and the wider chemical science community, and to meet the requirements of the RSC’s strategy and charter. The storage, retrieval, analysis and preservation of chemical information and data are of critical importance for research, development and education in the chemical sciences. All chemists, and everybody else who works with chemical substances, need tools and techniques for handling chemical information.

If you have already submitted your form you can make a request to join a group via email (membership@rsc.org) or telephone (01223 432141).

scan4.png

If you want to find out more about CICAG activities the newsletters are available here and if you have ideas for future activities feel free to contact the committee.


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RSC Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group

 

The website for RSC Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) has undergone an update http://www.rsccicag.org now includes more information on forthcoming events and awards, together with the latest CICAG newsletter. Please feel free to share.

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Groups, which exist to benefit RSC members and the wider chemical science community, and to meet the requirements of the RSC’s strategy and charter.

CICAG works to support users of chemical information, data and computer applications and advance excellence in the chemical sciences. Inform RSC members and others of the latest developments in these rapidly evolving areas and promote the wider recognition of excellence in chemical information and computer applications at this level

aifirst_announcement-


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RSC CICAG webite

 

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Group. The new website is now live, http://www.rsccicag.org

Why not have a browse around and let us know what else you would like to see included.

RSC_LOGO_CI+CAG_A4_PRINT


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The Royal Society of Chemistry Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) Winter Newsletter is now available Online

 

The Winter 2017-18 edition of the CICAG Newsletter has been published and can be downloaded from the Newsletters webpage.

Features in this edition which may be of interest include: * Details of CICAG's upcoming Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry meeting * 30th Anniversary celebration of the Catalyst Science Discovery Centre and a look at the scientific history and achievements of the area * Tony Kent Strix Award and Annual Lecture 2017 and eLucidate from UKeiG * Other CICAG planned and proposed meetings along with other upcoming conferences and events * Meeting reports * Book reviews * News from Infochem and CAS * A review of the latest chemical information news and developments

PhD Student and Post-Doc Conference Bursaries

Did you know that most CICAG sponsored meetings have a number of bursaries available for PhD and post-doctoral students? Normally up to a value of £250, these awards help to cover registration and travel costs. Preference will be given to members of the RSC (and meeting co-sponsors if applicable), especially those who are selected to give posters.

RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry Friday, 15th June 2018 Royal Society of Chemistry at Burlington House, London, UK. Twitter hashtag - #RSC_AIChem


Comments

RSC CICAG Membership

 

If you are a Royal Society of Chemistry member renewing your annual mebership, can I remind you that your membership entitles you to membership of up to THREE Interest Groups. Apparently only around 25% take advantage of this option so I'd urge you to have a look at the groups available.

In particular

86 Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Groups, which exist to benefit RSC members and the wider chemical science community, and to meet the requirements of the RSC’s strategy and charter.

If you have already submitted your form you can make a request to join a group via email (membership@rsc.org) or telephone (01223 432141).

The first announcement of a CICAG/BMCS meeting to be held next year.

RSC-BMCS / RSC-CICAG Artificial Intelligence in Chemistry Friday, 15th June 2018 Royal Society of Chemistry at Burlington House, London, UK.
Twitter hashtag - #RSC_AIChem

Comments

RSC CICAG Membership

 

Royal Society of Chemistry members will be getting their annual subscription details around now. Can I remind people that your membership entitles you to membership of up to THREE Interest Groups.

Scan3

I'd urge you to make use of them, in particular:-

86 Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group

Update

Currently it seems Members who wish to change/join interest groups and divisions currently need to request this via email (membership@rsc.org) or telephone (01223 432141).

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Groups, which exist to benefit RSC members and the wider chemical science community, and to meet the requirements of the RSC’s strategy and charter.

Scope and Aims

The storage, retrieval, analysis and preservation of chemical information and data are of critical importance for research, development and education in the chemical sciences. All chemists, and everybody else who works with chemical substances, need tools and techniques for handling chemical information.

CICAG works to:

  • Support users of chemical information, data and computer applications and advance excellence in the chemical sciences
  • Inform RSC members and others of the latest developments in these rapidly evolving areas
  • Promote the wider recognition of excellence in chemical information and computer applications at this level.

CICAG also organises a number of meetings each year at which members get reduced rates. Details of previous meetings are here.

You can also follow CICAG on Twitter https://twitter.com/RSC_CICAG or LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/groups/1989945.

twitterCICAG


Comments

The 3rd Tony Kent Strix Annual Lecture - FREE Event

 

FINAL PROGRAMME

Booking Reminder! The 3rd Tony Kent Strix Annual Lecture - FREE Event - Friday October 20th 2017

In 2016 the UK eInformation Group (UKeiG), in partnership with the International Society for Knowledge Organisation UK (ISKO UK), the Royal Society of Chemistry Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (RSC CICAG) and the British Computer Society Information Retrieval Specialist Group (BCS IRSG) was delighted to announce that the winner of the prestigious Tony Kent Strix Award was Maristella Agosti, Professor in Computer Science, Department of Information Engineering at the University of Padua, Italy. The Award is given in recognition of an outstanding practical innovation or achievement in the field of information retrieval.

Professor Agosti has built a world-wide reputation for her work in many aspects of information retrieval and digital libraries. She was one of the first people to work in information retrieval in Italy where she acted as a catalyst for creating a vibrant and internationally recognised IR research community.

Her 2017 Strix Lecture will be given at The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London during the afternoon of Friday 20th October.

The 2017 Tony Kent Strix Award winner will also be announced during the afternoon.

* This is a FREE event, open to everyone, BUT advance bookings ARE required. Please book your place by emailing Gary Horrocks at: ukeig.enquiries@gmail.com * Full programme details:
1.30 Registration
2.00 Doug Veal - Chairman's welcome
2.10 - A presentation from Alan Gilchrist
Title: 'Reflections: Some thoughts on the past, present and future of Information Retrieval'
(Doug and Alan are founding members of the Working Group that initiated the Award, first presented in 1998.)
2.45 - Questions & Discussion
3.00 - Tea & coffee
3.45 Maristella Agosti - The Tony Kent Strix Annual Memorial Lecture
Title: Behind the Scenes of Research and Innovation

Abstract: We often excel in producing scientific achievements, but at times turning those achievements into innovation and technology transfer can be a tall order. Furthermore, even though we may document our findings well in scientific publications and reports, we are far less accomplished and proficient in documenting and explaining how the complex process of transforming scientific results into innovation has been performed and proven successful. In general, most of the knowledge of this transfer process remains only with those taking part in it, while certain aspects such as the time and context when the transfer took place may be rich in lessons to be learnt and provide opportunities for future teaching in diverse fields. This talk addresses the complex process of transforming research outcomes into innovation using some relevant examples in the fields of information retrieval and digital libraries.

4.30 Questions & discussion

5.00 Meeting closes

The Annual Lecture series is sponsored by Google.

For more information about UKeiG and the Tony Kent Strix Award visit:

http://tinyurl.com/ybytwgkz


Comments

CICAG Summer newsletter

 

The 2017 Summer Newsletter is now available for download.

This includes reports from the scientific meetings supported, and details of potential future meetings, together with news items that might be of interest to members of RSC CICAG interest group.

The Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group (CICAG) is one of the RSC’s many member-led Interest Groups.

The aims of the group are:-

  • support users of chemical information, data and computer applications and advance excellence in the chemical sciences
  • inform  RSC members and others of the latest developments in these rapidly evolving areas;
  • promote the wider recognition of excellence in chemical information and computer applications at this level.

If you are an RSC member who is interested in joining the group contact the membership team


Comments

The Tony Kent Strix Award

 

UKeiG presents the Tony Kent Strix Award in partnership with the International Society for Knowledge Organisation (ISKO UK) and the British Computer Society Information Retrieval Specialist Group (BCS IRSG). The award is sponsored by the Royal Society of Chemistry Chemical Information & Computer Applications Group.

The UK electronic information Group (UKeiG) is now seeking 2017 nominations for this prestigious award.

The Tony Kent Strix Award is given in recognition of an outstanding practical innovation or achievement in the field of information retrieval in its widest sense, including search and data mining, for example. This could take the form of an application or service, or an overall appreciation of past achievements from which significant advances have emanated. The award is open to individuals or groups from anywhere in the world.

The deadline for nominations is Thursday 31st August 2017.

Nominations should be for achievement that meets one or more of the following criteria:

  • A major and/or sustained contribution to the theoretical or experimental understanding of the information retrieval process
  • Development of, or significant improvement in, mechanisms, a product or service for the retrieval of information, either generally or in a specialised field
  • Development of, or significant improvement in, easy access to an information service
  • Development and/or exploitation of new technologies to enhance information retrieval
  • A sustained contribution over a period of years to the field of information retrieval for example, by running an information service or by contributing at national or international level to organisations active in the field.

Key characteristics that the judges will look for in nominations are innovation, initiative, originality and practicality.

The information to be supplied in the nomination should comprise:

  • The name, institutional address and qualifications of the nominee
  • A brief biography (not more than one page of A4)
  • A relevant bibliography (i.e. not comprehensive but including the key publications relevant to the nomination)
  • A justification for the nomination, of not more than one page of A4, showing clearly which of the Strix award criteria the nominee meets and how the criteria are met
  • Additional material (e.g. letters of support - letters from past winners would be especially valuable).

It is possible that the Award Committee will request additional information from the nominators for those nominees considered suitable candidates for the award.

Nominations for the 2017 award should reach the judges by Thursday August 31st 2017 and be emailed to:

John Wickenden – Hon. Secretary UKeiG secretary.ukeig@cilip.org.uk
cc-ed to Gary Horrocks - UKeiG administrator admin@ukeig.org.uk
cc-ed to Sue Silcocks – Hon. Treasurer UKeiG treasurer.ukeig@cilip.org.uk


Comments

RSC Membership

 

Royal Society of Chemistry members will be getting their annual subscription details around now. Can I remind people that your membership entitles you to membership of up to THREE Interest Groups. I'd urge you to make use of them, in particular:-

33 Biological and Medicinal Chemistry Sector
86 Chemical Information and Computer Applications Group.

IMG_1339

Reduced subscription rates are also available to:

Full time postgraduate students (including PGCE students) – £19 Low income members with an income below £26,000 per annum – Fellow £74, Member £65, Associate £39, Affiliate £41 Retired members – Fellow £74, Member £65, Associate £39, Affiliate £41


Comments